A special second birthday in the mountains

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We celebrated the girls’ second birthday weekend by hiking up to and staying at Brunnsteinhütte in the Karwendel region. I recommend this if you do not feel like cakes, presents and all the birthday preparations – but instead simply enjoying nature, family time and the simplicity of a DAV-hut.

Brunnsteinhütte – a sustainable and family-friendly destination

Where to find it?

When researching new destinations that are realistic for us with the twins (remember, we each carry one child), I stick to the great DAV guide. DAV is short for Deutscher Alpenverein, the German Alpine Club. Each year it publishes a family-friendly hut booklet.

How to book Brunnsteinhütte?

While many huts can be booked conveniently via DAV, Brunnsteinhütte still runs the old-fashioned way: Email. As soon as it become clear that the harsh lockdown rules would be lifted I emailed the hut managers family Gallenberger and reserved their family room for up to 8 people. To confirm the reservation I wire-transfered a reservation fee of 12Euros per person to their account.

The hike up – a challenging, but beautiful hike

Very conveniently, the hut offers a parking lot close to the cable car for materials (where we dropped off all the sleeping bags and sheets we had to bring due to the new Corona hygiene rules). From there the path leads constantly up. The ground changes alters nicely between stones, larger rocks and forest ground with some roots exposed. I would assume it is not too pleasant to come here after its has rained. It took us about 2hours with breaks to walk up.

On the way back we walked across the suspension bridge. Here are some impressions from the hike:

Brunnsteinhütte offers great food and embraces sustainability

The Gallenbergers have been managing the hut for more then 20years, their kids grew up here. They offer hearty, Alpine food. The portions are enough to share, or, if you just came across another mountain pass they will definitely recharge you.

The toilets are natural composting toilets, meaning there is no running water, but a really big hole. There is only cold water in the washrooms and one has to take trash home again. Can you imagine what a pleasure it was to carry a bag of about 20 poop diapers home 😉

Important Links for your reference

Infant Care for Dummies – an entertaining evening

The last diaper I changed 18 years ago. Googling things like “taking care of twins” usually lead to Mami blogs that basically tell you that your life from now on is on the constant edge to suicidal, that you will never sleep again nor get your body back and that your friends are only good friends if they bring you food…

I stopped googling. 

Instead, Pouya and I spent a “night out” at the Red Cross Hospital in Munich where a wonderful nurse with 35 years of infant care experience teaches inexperienced grown-ups how to not kill their infants. It was hilarious. Some of my leanings:

  • How to spot young parents? Just look for people with puffy eyes and vomit on their shoulders. Our cute nurse was the only one in the room heartily laughing about this joke.
  • She warned us not to come back to the hospital if we think the baby has fever and instructed everyone to better learn how to measure temperature in the behinds.
  • Obviously, it is not a good idea to hold a conversation when changing boys’ diapers. Any distraction might result in you getting peed on. She also pointed out that, albeit being very small, little boys do have the ability to pee right into your face…Did I mention we’re expecting girls?

All together an entertaining evening which I can totally recommend to anyone. In case you run out of fun stuff to do, I would suggest to sign up for a “Säuglingspflegekurs“. Not more expensive than a movie ticket, and you’ll get free massage oil ;-).

A test of enduring uncertainty: my twin pregnancy

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TTTS, IUGR and a whole lot of waiting It was after two hours of sonography that the prenatal specialist closed his eyes as if he was going through his knowledge, repeating the observations. He summarized his findings in a rather … Continue reading